Striking Gold: Cultural History of the Osa Peninsula

Gold Panning

A favorite thing to do when visiting the Osa Peninsula is taking a day hike ecotour to the Tigres Rivers, a former gold mining spot in Corcovado National Park. Exploring this former gold mining area is an adventure back in time. The region was a thriving area for gold prospectors who came here in droves to strike it rich beginning with the early settlers. Named by Columbus, “The Rich Coast,” the Osa Peninsula was famous for its abundance of gold deposits.   In the 1930s, the discovery of gold triggered an economic boom.  The Peninsula was one of Costa Rica’s largest gold bearing regions until the 1980s.  At 21 karats, it is some of the world’s most pure gold.  In the 1970s gold mining was declared illegal with the creation of Corcovado National Park. Continue reading

What’s For Dinner?: Sustainable Fishing


Red Snapper Sustainable
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What’s for dinner? It’s a global question asked every night by people,  but few ask,  is it sustainable?  Fish often finds it way to the dinner plate.   Fish is a favorite food because it is brain food and low in calories helping to keep us healthy and in shape. However, most of us don’t think about the consequences of what we eat. The thought of whether of not our dinner plate is sustainable does not even cross the average mind. In the USA,  you can pretty much eat anything you want anytime of the year.

For most anglers, the ability to catch a fish and then eat it is a very rewarding experience.  Unsustainable commercial fishing practices threaten this tradition. For thousands of years, man has hunted for his dinner but without strong marine conservation programs, many game fish face extinction. Catch and release programs and sustainable fishing practices are implemented to protect vulnerable fish populations. Continue reading

Dorado AKA Mahi Mahi: An Offshore Treat

Giant Dorado aka Mahi Mahi
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World-famous offshore sport fishing in Costa Rica includes sailfish, marlin, roosterfish and dorado aka mahi mahi.  With so many incredible game fish to choose from, dorado remains a favorite catch among anglers.  This tiny country has some of the best sport fishing in the world largely due to their catch and release policy, which supports incredible variety in the species of fish that inhabit these waters.  Dorado is a dolphinfish not to be confused with dolphin, which are mammals.  It is also commonly referred to by its Hawaiian name, mahi mahi. Not only are they a chef’s favorite  they are also a favorite catch among sportfishermen around the world.  What better place to go fishing for dorado then offshore in the Southern Pacific Ocean off the coast of Costa Rica. Continue reading

Who Doesn’t Love A Difficult Catch?: Snook Fishing

Snook Fishing Costa Rica
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Deep in the Osa Peninsula if you are up for an exciting and challenging catch, you can go snook fishing. Snook are known for their incredible strength making them a real difficult catch and a prized game fish. The Osa Peninsula has some of the best fishing anywhere in the world coupled with the incredible biodiversity and richness of this area make’s it a traveler’s paradise.  The mouths of Costa Rica rivers are loaded with snook and the  mangrove estuaries are nurseries for snook.  You can fish for snook almost all year-long with the best times being May through April and then again January through March.  The best places  for snook fishing are rivers and surf, and the best time to fish for snook is at night especially during a full moon. Continue reading

The Daring Adventure of Night Fishing in the Osa Peninsula

Night Fishing
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There is something magical about night fishing in the Osa Peninsula. The best time to go is during a full moon. The ocean is quiet and peaceful with the moonlight reflecting on the water.  The summer months are prime targets for night fishing. Night is feeding time for most fish making it an ideal time to catch a really big one.  In the solitude and tranquility of fishing by the surf or in a boat, you will find fish move into the shallows to feed. Landing a fish in total darkness is like no other fishing experience. For the angler wanting a real thrill, it is all about night fishing. In the In the Osa Peninsula the many fishing choices include the expansive surf, the many winding rivers, mangroves and the deep blue clear Pacific Ocean.  Continue reading

Fishing: To Catch a Big Bad Fierce Cubera


Monster Pargo
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When an angler travels to Costa Rica to go fishing catching a Big Cubera is a real prize. The Pacific Coast of Costa Rica has some of the most consistent and exciting fishing in the world. It is no wonder it is a favored spot by both professional anglers and amateurs.  With waters abundant in sailfish, marlin, tuna, roosterfish, mackerel, mahi mahi and snapper, there is a catch here for any sport fisherman. But when it comes to snapper, which live in subtropical and tropical waters, in Costa Rica waters are the Big Cubera. It is the largest of all the snapper.  Big Cubera live on both coasts, they are more prevalent in the Pacific Ocean. Continue reading

Jumping off a Waterfall: Rappelling in Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula

Waterfall Rappelling
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For the adventurer ecotourist, Costa Rica is a prime spot for rappelling and if you are feeling super adventurous there is nothing like the rush from waterfall rappelling in Costa Rica.  The thrill of jumping off a cliff with water rushing over your head is a once in a lifetime experience. Costa Rica is a world- renown haven of caves, beaches, mountains, waterfalls and endless trails.  Hiking through a rainforest to a secluded waterfall where you ascend some 100ft to jump off a cliff into the water rushing down by a rope. The tougher the challenge, the bigger the rush.  Rappelling is not for the faint hearted and definitely appeals to those with an adventuresome spirit. Continue reading

Guaymi Indians: Teach Us for The Future


Guaymi Indians
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Bordering Corcovado National Park is the Guaymi Indian Reservation.  Located in the clouded forest high in the mountains, the Guaymi Indians have lived in this region for thousands of years. They moved to the reserve in the 1970s. A nomadic people, the Guaymi Indians occupied southern central Costa Rica and Western Panama.   Today they sill live a semi-nomadic life, despite their permanent settlements.  They strive to retain their cultural traditions. Fortunately because of the remoteness of the Osa Peninsula, they have preserved their cultural heritage.  The Guaymi Indians are the largest surviving indigenous population in Costa Rica. Continue reading

Small is Beautiful: Sustainable Agriculture on the Osa Peninsula

Shampoo Plant

I love chocolate and I love the earth, so when the two come together to form an organic sustainable farm that sounds like a good idea to me.  Kobo Farm, founded by four brothers, does just this by including a cocao orchard among the many crops it grows here.  The brothers had a vision to create a sustainable farm and went for it. It is not only a working farm, but also an educational center that ecotourists and locals visit. Here visitors learn about sustainable agriculture practices.  Kobo Farm is leading a growing trend in the area towards sustainable agriculture coupled with microfarming.  I’m betting chocolate will become the next big thing here too. Continue reading

The World’s Greatest Love: Cocoa

Chocolate Heart
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Chocolate is one of the world’s treasured delicacies.  Cocoa can be traced back to 600 A.D when the Mayans migrated to northern South America and established the first known Cocoa Plantation in the Yucatan.  Its early uses included not only eating it, but also using it as a currency.  It was cultivated by indigenous people as a sacred plant for thousands of years until discovered by Spain in the 1600s and has become a major international commodity. Continue reading